Baroque jems in Dresden

By Noah – Today was our first day exploring a new site on our way down south, Dresden. Famed for its old churches and beautiful architecture, this is a wonderful city that just needed to be explored by my mum and myself. Our first stop was the Albertinum, an old building that hosted a very strange exhibition that my mum didn’t really enjoy. Our next stop was the Frauenkirche, or the Church of our Lady.This very tall cathedral was completely destroyed in 1945, during WW2 and then completely rebuilt from 1994 before opening again in 2004/5. This reconstruction cost about €182 million and was partly funded by the U.K.. Coventry, for example, gave the church its gold cross that is perched at the very top. This is because the church was destroyed by the Coventry blitz but is now twinned with the English city as a show of friendship and forgiveness.

Our next stop was Zwinger. This was a huge, grassy courtyard with four fountains that was totally surrounded by baroque style buildings that held galleries and exhibitions. This is where e we sat down for a while to take lots of photos and have a bite to eat. Next, we walked along the river Elbe that runs all the way to the Czech border. This walk is called Brühl’s Terrace and there is another very old building on the waterfront. Our last stop today was Dresden Castle. Built in the 13th century, but then reduced to rubble during the war, this building contains the more treasures and valuable items that any other location in the whole of Europe. We looked through every single room we could and must have seen in excess of many millions of pounds worth of items.

On the way back we got back to old roots and did a bit of geocaching  near where we are staying. We found it with ease as another family was there when we arrived at the location. A bit of disjointed German halted us along  and we returned home with lots of photos to look over. Tomorrow we venture over the Elbe to see yet more sights in Dresden…

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About onebigfieldtrip

Mum and son round-the-world travellers.
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